It’s a story of success again by Facebook. This time it has witnessed the triumph with its big, solar-powered drone which has a take-off for the second time, and of course reaching the tenets of success. If you are interested in drones check out this 3dr solo review.

The social networking honcho regarded that its Aquila named Drone have accomplished its second test flight on 22nd May at the Yuma Proving Ground, which is a U.S. military facility in Arizona.

This drone, with the wingspan of a Boeing 737, took to flying for 1 hour and 46 minutes and also landed perfectly with ease on the already decided landing site, as reported by Facebook’s director of aeronautical platforms, Martin Luis Gomez.

The successful landing of this drone was much intended and required for Facebook as the test flight of the last summer could not score well, owing to the strong winds and technical faults in its autopilot system and the drone’s right wing snapping off. However, the unfortunate news of this crash was completely denied by Facebook until the National Transportation Safety Board(NTSB), who was given the charge of investigating the accident, released a public report of the crash.

So this time Facebook has been extra cautious and also published a short video of the successful landing in case if anyone raised a question and stirred up any controversy.

Image Credit: dronecenter.bard.edu

Features of the Drone:

The main reason behind the landing of this drone is a proof of the way in which Facebook’s new safety and anti-crashing method would work.

Gomez has explained the ways how Aquila’s second flight would be smoother than the last, enlisting more sensors on the drone’s body to acquire the additional aerial data, tweaking the autopilot and the installation of a horizontal propeller stopping mechanism to aid a successful landing.

Gomez has explained the ways how Aquila’s second flight would be smoother than the last, enlisting more sensors on the drone’s body to acquire the additional aerial data, tweaking the autopilot and the installation of a horizontal propeller stopping mechanism to aid a successful landing.

Aquila has also been successful in reaching an altitude of 3,000 feet in this second test flight which is suggestive of the fact that Facebook is almost on the verge of reaching up to its intended goal, which is to fly large fleets of these drones, hovering in the air for days at an altitude of 60,000 to 90,000 feet.

Present Scenario:

In spite of the successful landing, the other part of the coin also reveals the hard reality. A strong competition with the China Academy of Aerospace Aerodynamics, which is a China-based research institution, is in store for Facebook. This Chinese research institution has recently flown a solar- powered drone over 65,000 feet in the air. It is not clearly known how long the flight was but reportedly, the drone started off in the morning and flew back to the airport at night.