That the Social Media is an integral part of our lives these days, remains an undeniable fact. So much of our lives are tied up in the social media these days in different ways like photographs, posts and videos and even the comments and wishes of other individuals, that a minute without it is unimaginable. But, what exactly happens to these social media accounts after we die? I mean, I am sure, that at least for once this thought has hovered in your minds. I mean all those ‘valuable Memorial’ stuff just cannot wither away at one go. So what is to be done?

Now, this is the problem. All of us at one point of the time have thought about this but the idea of having a ‘digital legacy’ on Facebook, Twitter or any other social media account, has never really appeared in our minds. Here, it is also true that as more and more of the of your personal information, communications and photographs are shared online, there is a growing risk that one day your sentimental keepsakes could be locked up for ever. On the contrary, the prevailing risk also states that after death, the family and the dear ones would gain unwanted access to intimate records. So what is really needed is to gain protection over.

Here, it is also true that as more and more of the of your personal information, communications and photographs are shared online, there is a growing risk that one day your sentimental keepsakes could be locked up for ever. On the contrary, the prevailing risk also states that after death, the family and the dear ones would gain unwanted access to intimate records. So what is really needed is to gain protection over the online property after death, just like the ones done with the tangible assets.

Right at this juncture, this kind of law varies all around the world and as per almost all the succession laws, families have a default access to a deceased person’s memories and data. For instance, this means that families can ask for Facebook accounts to be deleted or for access to some of the content (but not private chats). Also, they can request the profile to be turned into a memorial.

 

 

 

 

For turning into a ‘legacy account’, first, the user needs to choose someone who would look after the account after it is memorialized. To add a legacy contact, first, the user needs to visit the account’s general setting, select ‘settings‘ and then click ‘manage the account.’

 

 

The second step involves, typing in a friend’s name and click ‘add’. To let the friend know they’re a legacy contact, a click on the ‘send’ is enough. Families can close or ‘memorialized accounts’ so certain features, like birthday reminders, no longer appear. Families can also ask Facebook for access to some of the account’s content (but not private chats).Of course, If users know that they won’t be using Facebook again, they can also permanently delete your account.

 

Twitter also closes accounts of the deceased at the request of family members via a Privacy Form. Otherwise, the only other option is to leave the account as is.

 

Instagram- If an Instagram account is detected that belongs to a diseased person, it can be reported to Instagram for memorialization. To report the account for memorialization, Instagram’s Help Center must be contacted, and proof of death must be provided via an obituary or news article. But, only immediate family members can request the account to be removed.

 

 

Gmail- The closing up of the primary account states that the Inactive Account Manager feature would allow using the account for a certain amount of time (3,6 or 9 months), before considering the account ‘inactive’. One month before that deadline, Google would send the user an e-mail alert or text message. If the user still hasn’t entered the account by then, Google will notify the ‘trusted contacts’ (which can be listed up to 10) and share the data with them. Google uses several signals to figure out whether the user is still using the Google Account, such as last sign-ins, recent activity, usage of Gmail and Android check-ins. Lastly, to set up the Inactive Account Manager, visit  www.google.com/settings/account/inactive and just click on ‘setup’.

 

 

 

The ending words should be definitely taken from Terry Tennens, Chief Executive of the National Society of Allied and Independent Funeral Directors (SAIF), where he regarded that “We would encourage people to leave clear instructions about what should happen to their emails, social networking sites, and other online accounts. It may be sensible to highlight any login details or passwords in a separate document alongside their will.”